Sugar & Dairy Free Keto Matcha Biscuits

SUGAR & DAIRY FREE KETO MATCHA BISCUITS

Sugar & Dairy Free Keto Matcha Biscuits. 0.3-0.75g net carbs.

Love matcha? These deliciously sweet bites are just the ticket.

To celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, shamrocks are de rigeur. Well…not really. If you don’t want to bother with either the Royal Icing decoration or the shamrock shape itself, these keto-friendly beauties are absolutely fine left plain and simple.  They take very little effort and bake in a blink.


I’ve made two options, one with nut flour and one without. Both dairy free and equally delicious, so you can choose which you prefer. And I have the perfect keto Royal Icing instructions for you as well!

How to Make Sugar & Dairy Free Keto Matcha Biscuits

Before you begin, please be aware that these are British biscuits, which are similar to American cookies. Except that they’re hard, dry and crumbly, as British biscuits are meant to be.

Sugar & Dairy Free Keto Matcha Biscuits

For the first option I’ve used coconut flour and oat fibre, plus egg white. For the second option, you’ll need coconut flour and almond flour, but no egg white. The ingredients I chose were specifically intended to keep calories and carbs as low as possible without sacrificing taste. Other flours would work just as well, in variable ratios, with different macros. It’s a matter of choice of course, and you’re free to experiment as you wish.

The method is very simple, so it would be silly to repeat instruction – sorry, Sir Google, your 1,500 words requirement is ridiculous.

Sugar & Dairy Free Keto Matcha Biscuits

Here are A FEW TIPS instead:

Matcha tea powder can be very weak or very strong. Snixikitchen has a good post that explains matcha flavour and grades.

You might prefer a hint of flavour, rather than a strong earthy flavour. It’s all a matter of taste and matcha quality. If unsure, use 1 teaspoon for your first bake and adjust the quantity in future bakes. Vibrant green, ceremonial grade matcha is the best, but can be very pricey. In the images you see, the paler biscuits contain 1 teaspoon of matcha tea powder. The greener ones contain 2 teaspoons and have a much stronger matcha flavour.

If you make Option 2 (no egg white), the ‘dough’ will be sand-like, looser and therefore more difficult to work with. I find that using cling film to shape and flatten the mixture makes the job a lot easier. Chilling is necessary, so allow extra time if you opt for this version. Option 1 creates a dough that’s more malleable and doesn’t necessitate chilling.

The shamrock shape is obviously a choice. And so is the icing. Can’t be bothered? Nothing wrong with that!

Sugar & Dairy Free Keto Matcha Biscuits

For the Royal Icing (a Mary Berry recipe adaptation), you only need a small amount of albumen. Use the smallest egg you have, weigh the white, and then, if it’s more than the weight described in the recipe, lightly beat it and discard what you don’t need. You will obtain quite a bit of Royal Icing with that 1/2 egg white. By nature, Royal Icing is very sweet, so I recommend you don’t use too much of it. Otherwise, its sickly sweetness will drown the flavour of your Sugar & Dairy Free Keto Matcha Biscuits. Which would be a real shame.

Happy St. Patrick’s to you all. Enjoy!

SUGAR & DAIRY FREE KETO MATCHA BISCUITS
 
Author: 
Nutrition
  • Yield: 11 biscuits
  • Serving: 1 biscuit (option 1)
  • Calories: 40
  • Fat: 4g
  • Net Carbs: 0.3g
  • Protein: 1g
Recipe type: Biscuits & Cookies
Cuisine: Ketogenic. Sugar Free. Dairy Free. Low Carb. LCHF. Grain Free. Gluten Free.
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Double take for these delightful matcha biscuits. Two recipe options. Plus Royal Icing made easy.
Ingredients
Option 1 (Dairy-Free + Nut-Free)
Option 2 (Dairy-Free + Egg-Free)
  • 50g fine coconut flour
  • 30g fine almond flour (U.S. option HERE)
  • 40g erythritol
  • ¼ tsp pure stevia powder
  • 1 tsp matcha tea powder
  • 30g coconut oil
  • 20g cacao butter
Royal Icing
Instructions
To Make Option 1 (11 biscuits):
  1. pre-heat oven to 150°C static.
  2. mix dry ingredients; melt coconut oil and cacao butter and let cool, then add to the dry mix.
  3. lightly whip egg white and combine.
  4. form a dough and place it over a piece of cling film; dust with a little coconut flour to stop it sticking; cover with another piece of cling film and flatten with a rolling pin to about 5mm thickness.
  5. cut our shapes using a cookie cutter (I used THIS; U.S. option HERE), reworking the remaining dough until you obtain 11 biscuits.
  6. place them on an oven rack lined with parchment paper and bake them for 10-12 mins - or until just starting to become golden around the edges; leave to cool inside - oven door open.
To Make Option 2 (9 biscuits):
  1. mix dry ingredients; melt coconut oil and cacao butter and let cool, then add to the dry mix.
  2. scoop the mixture over a sheet of cling film and shape it into a ball (it will be sand-like), then chill it for 30 mins.
  3. pre-heat oven to 150°C static.
  4. place the chilled dough over a piece of cling film; cover with another piece of cling film and flatten with a rolling pin to about 7mm thickness (it will be quite crumbly so use the cling film to help keep it together).
  5. cut out shapes using a cookie cutter, reworking the remaining dough until you obtain 9 in total.
  6. chill the biscuits for 15 minutes.
  7. place them on an oven rack lined with parchment paper and bake them for 10-12 mins - or until just starting to become golden around the edges; leave to cool inside - oven door open.
To Make the Royal Icing:
  1. using an electric hand-held balloon whisk (U.S. option HERE), beat egg white, lemon juice and glycerine until frothy, then add powdered erythritol and whip for a few seconds until firm; check consistency and add a little more lemon juice if necessary - should be of piping consistency.
  2. add a little food colouring paste if required, then transfer to a piping bag with 2mm round nozzle and decorate your cooled biscuits; the Royal Icing will air dry quite quickly.
Notes
Use 1-2 tsp of matcha tea powder, or more, depending on whether you prefer a mild matcha flavour or a more prominent one.

Option 1 creates more biscuits because the ‘dough’ can be rolled out more thinly.

The best way to measure the egg white is to beat it first, weigh it, then use the 22g needed.

You will obtain way more Royal Icing than you’ll need. I recommend you go easy with the icing, or your biscuits will be sickly sweet.

Store the biscuits, whether iced or not, on your kitchen counter, where they'll remain hard for several days - no need to cover.

Macros for Option 1 (whole batch values): Kcal 438; F 41g; TC 34g; f 31g; NC 3g; P 9.8g. If you obtain 11 biscuits, the macros for each is in the Nutrition box. If you obtain fewer or more biscuits, divide the batch values above by the number of biscuits you obtained.

Macros for Option 2 (whole batch values) Kcal 670; F 57g; TC 30.4g; f 23.7g; NC 6.7g; P 22.5g.

If you obtain 9 biscuits, the macros for each is: Kcal 75g; F 6g; TC 3.37g; f 2.63g; NC 0.75g; P 2.5g. If you obtain fewer or more biscuits, divide the whole batch values by the number of biscuits you obtained.

The only way to ensure accurate measurement of ingredients is with Metric Kitchen Scales. Click HERE for the ones I use, or HERE for U.S. alternative.

Your feedback matters to me! Please leave a comment below. If you try this recipe, you’ll make my day by sharing a photo on social media with the hashtag #queenketo. Thank you! 🙂

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3 Comments

  1. Hi, interesting recipe. would love to try. How long it can be stored? or are they only to eat instantly?

  2. Gladys O'Brien

    Question: Can you explain what matcha tastes like?
    Thank you.
    Gladys
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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